A Winter Garden

Things are well underway. Most of the winter/spring crops are in the ground and so far doing well. I decided to move the schedule up a bit and see just how much I could overwinter. All these crops have done well so far. Planting garlic, onions and strawberries in the fall for spring harvest is not that unusual, but I have never tried any other veggies on a serious basis. After watching the success of a volunteer spinach plant that sprouted in the fall of 2022, lived through the winter and put on a lot of growth as soon as there was just a hint of spring in the air, I decided that I might go all in on ‘winter’ garden. So I started and planted out kohlrabi, spinach, lettuce, mustard, kale and fava beans. The weather so far has been mild and all the plants are doing well, and in some cases better than I expected. There is a lot of lettuce that is ready to be harvested. I am hoping it will just hang out at least for a couple of months. I think the lettuce will be fine until there are some really warm days, maybe mid March, and then there might be some bolting. It will be interesting to see how the other veg does. I am even thinking there may be time to slip in some catch crops if I can time it right. I have a few ideas that I am working on incorporating, but this is a learning year. Of course, isn’t every year a learning year?




Spring Plans

I sketched out my planting plans a couple of months ago so I could go ahead and order any seeds I needed. Of course I was well aware that things could change, but I was feeling pretty good that I had made thoughtful, well reasoned choices. I am focusing a lot on the Spring season this year. Previously I had limited the Spring plants because I wanted to get the warm season plants in and then out for the Fall plants. But Fall is terrible in this garden, too much shade and too many bugs, and sometimes that doesn’t matter because it is just too hot to get the seeds started anyway. So the plan is to let Spring ride for a while and get the Summer crops in later than in the past and try to keep them producing for longer. Basically I am abandoning the Fall season, though I’ll probably put out some kind of cover crop if there is open space due to whatever complication (insects, weather, rabbit, deer, etc.) arises. So I filled the Spring plan with a couple of my recent winners and a couple of new items, like kohlrabi and shelling peas, ordered the seeds and was ready to go.

I started planting this weekend. Of course, this being the second year of this ‘full’ garden, I had no idea how many seeds I needed. Usually a pack of seeds might last 2 or 3 seasons. Unfortunately, the peas I got only filled about a quarter to a third of the space allotted. I wasn’t going to purchase more seeds. I was looking through my bin of old seed for alternatives, when I had my genius idea of the week. I’d planted a few strawberries in a shady front bed where not much grew as a ground cover. Of course they took the place over in a couple of years. They flower and send runners everywhere and I see some fruit which of course always disappears before I can get to it. But what if I dug some of those plants and moved them the garden on plastic the way the pros do? Spread them out, protect them? Worth it? I guess I’ll find out. A harmless experiment. Around here the PYO strawberry places run for about the month of May, so I’m hoping I can get a few strawberries around that time and then be able to move them out. Sweet Potatoes go in these beds for the Summer so they’ll have to share the space for a month or two, but it should work out OK.

strawberries planted on black plastic
Very Professional!

I love being able to make changes in the garden and try new things. Although things don’t always work out, I learn and move on. Maybe my experiments are more successful than they used to be, maybe not. It is nice to think I might be getting better at this gardening thing, but it doesn’t take long to be brought back to reality when the season really gets going!