April 2023

Somehow the year always gets away from me – here it is November and I see I have an old post from April. I don’t want it to go to waste, so here it is!

This year I decided to take full advantage of the spring vegetable garden. Rather than leaving a few blocks open to put some of the summer stuff in at the ‘normal’ time, the garden is currently full with plants that started going in, well back in November for some of them, but most were out by the end of February, beginning of March. It seems to be working fine, although it does seem very odd to not have much to do right now. I have planted out a few things, notably some basil and sunflowers, and pulled a few weeds over the last couple of weeks but that is about it. The last average frost date for my area is April 15, so this is normally the time to really get cranking, but I am just enjoying the garden and some beautiful weather. There has been plenty of lettuce, some spinach and most recently some sugar snaps that we have been able to enjoy. Salad days, indeed. But it won’t last, of course, come the mid to end of May, it will be time to turn it over. This will mean both processing the harvest of garlic, onions, shallots, peas, cilantro and dill and maybe kohlrabi and carrots if they turn out, as well as getting the beds composted and the summer seedlings out so they can be settled in before the real heat of the summer. For now, though, there is plenty of time to observe and enjoy.




Max Dogwood

There are a lot of little things going on in the garden that hint at the spring days ahead. The dogwood is the big undeniable thing, shouting that Spring has arrived. When we first moved in, there may have been a bloom or two that first spring. As the trees have been thinned out and the tree has gotten more sun, it has responded with a big show. If I had begun this garden as a blank canvas, this is not the location I would have placed this tree. But it is the one tree in the entire yard I have never contemplated cutting down. Everything else has to work around it.



Spring Plans

I sketched out my planting plans a couple of months ago so I could go ahead and order any seeds I needed. Of course I was well aware that things could change, but I was feeling pretty good that I had made thoughtful, well reasoned choices. I am focusing a lot on the Spring season this year. Previously I had limited the Spring plants because I wanted to get the warm season plants in and then out for the Fall plants. But Fall is terrible in this garden, too much shade and too many bugs, and sometimes that doesn’t matter because it is just too hot to get the seeds started anyway. So the plan is to let Spring ride for a while and get the Summer crops in later than in the past and try to keep them producing for longer. Basically I am abandoning the Fall season, though I’ll probably put out some kind of cover crop if there is open space due to whatever complication (insects, weather, rabbit, deer, etc.) arises. So I filled the Spring plan with a couple of my recent winners and a couple of new items, like kohlrabi and shelling peas, ordered the seeds and was ready to go.

I started planting this weekend. Of course, this being the second year of this ‘full’ garden, I had no idea how many seeds I needed. Usually a pack of seeds might last 2 or 3 seasons. Unfortunately, the peas I got only filled about a quarter to a third of the space allotted. I wasn’t going to purchase more seeds. I was looking through my bin of old seed for alternatives, when I had my genius idea of the week. I’d planted a few strawberries in a shady front bed where not much grew as a ground cover. Of course they took the place over in a couple of years. They flower and send runners everywhere and I see some fruit which of course always disappears before I can get to it. But what if I dug some of those plants and moved them the garden on plastic the way the pros do? Spread them out, protect them? Worth it? I guess I’ll find out. A harmless experiment. Around here the PYO strawberry places run for about the month of May, so I’m hoping I can get a few strawberries around that time and then be able to move them out. Sweet Potatoes go in these beds for the Summer so they’ll have to share the space for a month or two, but it should work out OK.

strawberries planted on black plastic
Very Professional!

I love being able to make changes in the garden and try new things. Although things don’t always work out, I learn and move on. Maybe my experiments are more successful than they used to be, maybe not. It is nice to think I might be getting better at this gardening thing, but it doesn’t take long to be brought back to reality when the season really gets going!

Spring!

This time of year I am full of optimism about the garden. It is full of life and energy, and I love walking around seeing all the plants waking up!

Already going strong:
Plenty of lettuce
Cilantro
Cabbage
Garlic
Peas
Onions
Carrots and Radishes just starting to come up

I harvest herbs – green onions, parsley, thyme, oregano and mint all through the winter, but it is now time to start harvesting some lettuce. I have tried to keep track of my harvest in the past and have failed to do it consistently so that is really going to be a focus this year.

Still early but things are growing!

It is going to be a good year!
Future blueberries

Waiting

3/4/21 Waning Gibbous Moon | High 63 | Low 34

Over the last couple of weeks, I got most of the heavy lifting I wanted to get done around the garden out of the way. It seems like there are always projects to work on, but at the moment I am going to enjoy a little of the calm before the storm. Compost is spread, seeds are started, sprouts are sprouting, it’s too cold for insects, the weeds haven’t woken up yet and the squirrels have almost given up digging around all over the garden. There is not much to do but wait. I did order 2 paw paws and 2 serviceberries so I am waiting for them, as well. It is nice to enjoy the garden with out feeling as though I must do something. It is fun to watch it come to life. It takes a bit of patience this time of year, though. It seems so slow, but with the warmth and the sun, things are starting to perk up. The next few weeks will see big changes.

Yugoslavian Red Lettuce. About to plant out.
Kale. The seed starting area was getting crowded, so some things had to be moved out.
Sown radish and lettuce coming up under row cover.
The section planted 1/1 has been out from under the cover for almost two weeks. Looking good, but growing slow. Garlic along the front is starting to look alive.
Blueberry buds. Vaccinium spp.
Lacinato Kale. Standing tall through the winter.
Daffodil ‘Dutch Master’. Narcissus spp.